littlerussianspider:

pleasantandcain:

No but if Clint is in a HYDRA facility being experimented on or some shit imagine Natasha’s reaction when she finds out

She would raze HYDRA to the ground herself.

…Raze it to the ground?

I would make the builders who mixed the cement for the foundations rue the day their parents got horny.

(via swietek93)

Amongst other things, Girlfriend and I occasionally write Norse mythology in a vague attempt to be more Gaimanesque.

In today’s search for inspiration and information I not only came across the usual flood of T Hiddy appreciation posts and Sigyn self-insert fics (neither of which I can really condemn) but also a special corner of the internet apparently dedicated to the most recent Game of Thrones episode. WHAT ARE YOU TRYING TO TELL ME, INTERNET?

nimueofthenorth:

Skadi, in Norse Mythology, the giant wife of the sea god Njörd. In order to avenge the death of her father, the giant Thiazi, Skadi took up arms and went to attack the rival tribe of the gods (the Aesir) in Asgard, home of the gods. The Aesir, wanting to appease her anger, offered her the choice of one of their number for a husband, with the stipulation that she choose a god by his legs (or feet) alone. She chose Njord, thinking that he was the fair god Balder; their marriage failed because Njord preferred to live by the sea, and Skadi was happier in her father’s home in the mountains (Thrymheim).

"Hateful for me are the mountains,I was not long there,only nine nights.The howling of the wolvessounded ugly to meafter the song of the swans.”

Skadi responded:

"Sleep I could noton the sea bedsfor the screeching of the bird.That gull wakes me when from the wide sea he comes each morning.”

In some sources, Skadi was known as the goddess of snowshoes. Another tradition relates that Skadi later married the god Odin and bore him sons. And yet another that she after that married Ull. The god of justice and dueling.
In chapter 8 of the Heimskringla book Ynglinga saga, Skadi appears in an euhumerized account. This account details that Skadi had once married Njord but that she would not have sex with him, and that later Skadi married Odin. Skadi and Odin had “many sons”. Only one of the names of these sons is provided:Sæmingr, a king of Norway. Two stanzas are presented by the skald Eyvindr skaldaspillir in reference. In the first stanza, Skadi is described as a jötunn and a “fair maiden”. A portion of the second stanza is missing. The second stanza reads:

Of sea-bones,and sons manythe ski-goddessgat with Óthin

nimueofthenorth:

Skadi, in Norse Mythology, the giant wife of the sea god Njörd. In order to avenge the death of her father, the giant Thiazi, Skadi took up arms and went to attack the rival tribe of the gods (the Aesir) in Asgard, home of the gods. The Aesir, wanting to appease her anger, offered her the choice of one of their number for a husband, with the stipulation that she choose a god by his legs (or feet) alone. She chose Njord, thinking that he was the fair god Balder; their marriage failed because Njord preferred to live by the sea, and Skadi was happier in her father’s home in the mountains (Thrymheim).

"Hateful for me are the mountains,
I was not long there,
only nine nights.
The howling of the wolves
sounded ugly to me
after the song of the swans.”

Skadi responded:

"Sleep I could not
on the sea beds
for the screeching of the bird.
That gull wakes me
when from the wide sea
he comes each morning.”

In some sources, Skadi was known as the goddess of snowshoes. Another tradition relates that Skadi later married the god Odin and bore him sons. And yet another that she after that married Ull. The god of justice and dueling.

In chapter 8 of the Heimskringla book Ynglinga saga, Skadi appears in an euhumerized account. This account details that Skadi had once married Njord but that she would not have sex with him, and that later Skadi married Odin. Skadi and Odin had “many sons”. Only one of the names of these sons is provided:Sæmingr, a king of Norway. Two stanzas are presented by the skald Eyvindr skaldaspillir in reference. In the first stanza, Skadi is described as a jötunn and a “fair maiden”. A portion of the second stanza is missing. The second stanza reads:

Of sea-bones,
and sons many
the ski-goddess
gat with Óthin

exlibrisfangirl reblogged your post and added:

This is one of my favorite posts of all time. Thank you for letting me live vicariously through you. *GIVES YOU ALL THE HUGS*

Wheee! I don’t know why seeing this made my morning quite as much as it did, but thank you, you have made me a super happy lady! It remains one of my favourite memories- and also one of my first posts on tumblr which people actually read, which was wonderful and terrifying and a little bewildering. Also, Joe looks like a little pile of warm in a jumper, and that’s always nice to be reminded of.

I also just realised that I started my review of the Dumb Waiter and then never finished it, mostly because suddenly jobs and real life and things. I shall have to dig it out and finish it, because damn that play was excellent.

Mythology | Valkyrie 

Valkyries (from the Old Norse Valkyrja, in Norse mythology, daughters of the principal god Odin, are often called Odin’s maidens. At his bidding, they flew on their horses over the fields of every battle to choose the souls of the heroic dead. Belief in the existence of magic horsewomen from heaven was widespread in Germanic and Scandinavia cultures, though they were called by different names.

The Valkyries carried out the will of Odin in determining the victors in battle and of course the war.  As each Valkyrie performed differing tasks according to Odin’s instruction, it was their prime duty to ride into the battlefield and choose the fallen heroes of the field. To be chosen by a Valkyrie and carried off on her white steed to Valhalla was considered an honor to the dying Viking warrior, for Valkyries only chose the bravest of the slain, gathering souls found deserving of an afterlife. They traveled far-and-wide searching for the dead in battlefields, oceans and seas for mortal men worthy of the grand hall. However, if the Viking warriors are deemed unworthy by the Valkyries, the goddess Hel in a cheerless underground world received them after their death. [x]

(Source: lydiasgotstiles)

crochet-gifs:

Learn to Crochet!
Crochet Gif Tutorials: Foundation Double Crochet

You may find this easier if you are already familiar with the Foundation Single Crochet - the concept is exactly the same, just with dc’s rather than sc’s! 

The Foundation method is an alternative to the starting chain. It makes a row of chains, and a row of double crochet stitches, all in one go. 

Oh, hello usefulness.

(via almostmrsstevens)